Gaming in the Cloud

I’m going to have to start off this post with a little background story. Last night at approximately 8PM I lost all the data that was stored on my MacBook’s hard drive. That’s over 400GB of movies, TV shows, pictures, and music. I also lost the local copies of all of my websites. Lucky enough for me I work on all of my sites live with Coda, therefore nothing was completely lost.

How did I lose this, you ask? Well, on my MacBook Pro I had two partitions, one for Snow Leopard and the other for Windows 7.¬† Yeah yeah I know, an Apple fanboy using Windows, but let me just mention that I use it for the sole purpose of gaming. Anyway, back on topic, I noticed that my Windows partition wasn’t mounting in Snow Leopard any more, so I went to try to diagnose the problem. I went into Windows and set the active partition to the Snow Leopard partition (I deduced this solution from my days of a hackintosher), though this did not work and actually did not let me boot into Snow¬†Leopard OR Windows 7. I didn’t panic because I figured I could pop in the Windows 7 installation disc, open up a command line, and then set the Windows partition as the active partition. Little did I know that trying that would convert the whole drive to MBR, thus making both partitions unbootable and unmountable. I went through and tried to repair either of the partitions just so that I wouldn’t lose anything, but each repair procedure I tried ended in failure.

That’s when I just got pissed and frustrated and just decided to screw both installations and start from scratch. The only thing that I really REALLY wanted to save were my saved games for Oblivion. I was able to pop in the 7 install disc and grab the files off of the partition before I wiped everything. I mean, hey, I spent over 48 hours in that game. Anyway, I got everything reinstalled and kept thinking there had to be a better way to prevent this.

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Change your external IP

I ran into a problem today; I was trying to connect to an external server via SSH, but the server kept dropping me. I narrowed it down to the idea of the server blocking my external IP address. I tried everything from SSH proxies to SSH web clients. The web client consoleFISH worked out sorta well, but it was slow and it didn’t give me the feel of Terminal’s “Homebrew” view.

Then I thought, “Wait a minute, what if I just changed my IP address?” knowing that I had a dynamic IP with my ISP. Turns out that it was the easiest solution, though it may not work for everybody. I read up on the subject and found that most cable ISP’s give you an IP address based on the MAC address of your router. It makes sense too if you think about it. Whenever I swapped out my router I noticed that we got a different IP address, and because the MAC address was really the only thing that changed (from a connection standpoint) it just clicked.

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